Friday, May 26, 2017

Great article with more photos of Dubrow's



Marcia Bricker Halperin is very familiar to readers of this blog, as several of her photos have been featured here. Well, now you can see more!  Over at the blog Jeremiah's Vanishing New York she recalls what made Dubrow's so special, as well.  This seems particularly relevant for readers here, especially as it quotes directly from this blog:

"Dubrow's is often called the "last cafeteria." In one of the articles on the Dubrow's Blog it's described as a place to "kibitz and nosh and argue the fate of the world." What is the value of kibitzing, noshing, and arguing our fate? What allowed it to happen at a place like Dubrow's and where do you think it happens today?

There's a theory about communities called "Third Places." After your home and your workplace comes the need for some social institution. The Irish had bars, the Italians had social clubs, but Jews had cafeterias in New York. They came to eat, but just as importantly to talk. Of course cyberspace is like a "third place" now. The demise of cafeterias was tied to the rise in affluence. People opted for waiter service and felt it was beneath them to carry their own tray. Cafeteria chains prevailed much longer in the South and Midwest where it wasn't until the last decade that many have closed, but they lacked the opulence of the big city ones.

The closest you can come to the feel of an old cafeteria today is at Katz's Deli. The ticket machine, the long counter on one wall, the frenetic feel with people carrying trays laden with Jewish-style foods in search of an empty table. The sound is reminiscent of old cafeterias too--cutlery rattling and lots of conversation. But I don't think you would scour the tables for a familiar face or a comfortable table to share and strike up a conversation with a stranger. By contrast, the dozens of coffee joints around my neighborhood are tomb-like since almost everyone is on their laptop
."

Also, I discovered someone (perhaps Marcia Bricker Halperin herself, seeing as how her photo shows up here, too) submitted Dubrow's Cafeteria to the blog "Place Matters" with a link to this blog.  I agree! Places do matter.  And if there's one thing I have learned from the years of maintaining this blog, it's that Dubrow's did matter.  And still does.

Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Dubrow's in the NY Times again

Marcia Bricker Halperin has taken many photos of Dubrow's - as well as many other landmarks of NYC - and her work is featured in the New York Times. Dubrow's referenced, as well as many other great NYC eateries. Check it out!

Monday, April 03, 2017

Dubrow's New York Style Deli inspired by Dubrow's Cafeteria

I was so confused when I saw this restaurant, located in Houston, Texas, that I had to email the owner via their website. The owner is even named Ziggy Gruber, and Gruber, is a family name in the larger Dubrow extended family. But I got this response:

Dear Eve, 
I am not related in anyway to the Dubrow family. My name is Ziggy Gruber I am third generation delicatessen owner. My family had the first delicatessen on Broadway called the Rialto they also had numerous other delis all around the city like Bergers on 47 st and in the suburbs Cresthill kosher deli in Spring Valley New York and the Woodrow kosher deli in Hewlett Long Island. My father's brother my uncle's name is Seymour and that is a coincidence. My uncle Norman who is much older than me technically is my cousin his name is Norman Rappaport. My family has been a deli dynasty in New York since the early 1900s. I presently own a well-known deli called Kenny and Ziggys in Houston Texas. We were looking to expand to a new concept that was a combination of Jewish delicatessen foods and Houston's restaurant that serves steaks, fish and cocktails. While trying to come up with a name for this concept. I was thinking about old Jewish restaurant names and Dubrows came to mind. My patent attorney did a trademark and patent search and saw the name Dubrows was abandoned for many years. So we applied and received the mark. There is presently a documentary out called Deli man and if you see it you will see it is my goal to perpetuate Jewish culture through food and if you have ever eaten my food or read our reviews you will see I will do the great name of Dubrows justice. I hope this clarifies the mystery. If you have anymore questions don't hesitate to contact me
All the best,
Ziggy Gruber



So there you have it. An homage to Dubrow's down in Texas, from someone unrelated to the family. I'd love to know from anyone in Houston if his restaurant even vaguely resembles Dubrow's Cafeteria.

Request for Dubrow's tuna salad recipe

Reader Andrew Suser asks for it. Now, tuna salad seems easy enough to make so if the Dubrow's recipe was unique or special it's got to be in the seasonings or the add-ins. Anyone recall it want to help Andrew out?

Monday, January 09, 2017

Letter from the daughter of a Miami Beach Dubrow's employee

I received an email from Carole Chapman, who had this to say about her father Carl Kobitz:

"Hi
After my dad was discharged from the navy he moved to Miami Beach. The next day he got a job at dubrows in 1946. He worked the season and managed to save $3000! He started as a bus boy and moved up to be a server.
My dad is still alive and he is 91!"

Nice to hear from someone outside the family who worked at the Dubrow's in Miami Beach.  Anyone out there remember Carl?

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

JFK at King's Highway Dubrow's (Close up)




I think that memories of Kennedy campaigning at Dubrow's might win for the memory most commonly reported by people who have contacted me through this blog. It makes sense - it was clearly a big deal, and as these pictures show, hundreds or perhaps thousands of people showed up.

Edit: I found this article in Sheepshead Bites that has a nice description of one person's memory of Kennedy campaigning in front of Dubrow's. It also confirms what my sense was - Kennedy's assassination was one of the most defining event for Baby Boomers, and so many of them have also retained closely their memories of him as president and campaigning to become president.

 "My singular Kennedy experience was when the senator, after winning the Democratic nomination, campaigned in Brooklyn, in the summer of 1960, for New York’s 45 electoral votes. My friend Larry and I went to the rally along Kings Highway that stretched from Ocean Avenue to Coney Island Avenue, and onto several side streets, and waited hours among the jam-packed crowd. As we stood at the East 16th Street intersection, opposite Dubrow’s cafeteria, we were constantly pushed and shoved by others impatiently awaiting the candidate’s motorcade."

(Neil Friedman, Nov 23, 2013, retrieved from http://www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/11/jfk-assassination-remains-a-defining-moment-for-baby-boomers/)

Tuesday, August 09, 2016

A question from a reader

I received this query from a reader a few days ago:

Dear Eve,

From 1966 to 1972, my father  owned Dave's Luncheonette on 1673 East 13th Street, just off the corner from  Kings Highway. Do you remember it, and would you know if there are there  any photographs 


Irwin Gordon

Can anyone help Irwin out? Anyone recall Dave's Luncheonette on King's Highway in Brooklyn? It would have been close to where the Dubrow's was.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

A question from a reader

I received the following email and thought I'd post it here to see if anyone can answer his question:

I am Bill Siroty, grandson of Gussie (Schwartz) Siroty, and great-grandson of Riva and Menachim Schwartz, which I think makes Simcha my great-great-Uncle. Michael Schwartz is my father’s first cousin. 

 I don’t know if anyone can answer this question: I was at the Kings Highway Dubrows in Spring 1972 and asked the cashier if Paul was there. I didn’t really know Paul but my father would be upset that I was there and didn’t ask to see him. I gave the cashier my name and she asked if my father was Danny. She said she used to date him! I can’t remember her name now, my father remembered her but that’s all the information I have. My father was 55 in 1972, born in 1917 so I guess this woman was a little younger. 

 Even if you don’t know this women it is still fun nostalgia. 

 Thanks, Bill Siroty Manchester, NH

 Does anyone know about Paul who worked the cashier at King's Highway? Paul Tobin was a manager and owner, but of the Manhattan location, and probably didn't work the cash register much. So it probably wasn't him.